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Conservation areas are areas of special architectural or historic interest where it is desirable to preserve or enhance the character or appearance of that area.

In addition to the quality of buildings, there are many other factors which contribute to the value of a conservation area. The historic layout of roads, public spaces, parks, trees, street furniture, street surfaces, views and vistas are all significant aspects of the appearance of an area and help to give it its special character.

Local authorities have the statutory duty and power to designate conservation areas under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990. The special character and appearance of the area is based on local criteria rather than national importance.

Certain types of building work or changes of use of existing buildings do not require planning permission as they are covered by "Permitted Development Rights". In general terms, the Planning Portal website provides useful information on the types of development covered by these rights and other permissions you may need to seek before you start work. The Planning Portal also contains an interactive house model, which is a good source of information on whether or not permission is required for certain types of householder development.

Within a conservation area there are extra planning controls over demolition, minor developments and the protection of trees. In addition to these extra planning controls there may also be some special planning controls in the form of Article 4 Directions.

Epsom & Ewell currently contains 21 Conservation Areas. 11 of these are covered by Article 4 Directions. You can find out if your property is located in a Conservation Area or if there is an Article 4 Direction in place via our online mapping system.

Conservation Area Appraisals and Management Plans

Each of the Borough's Conservation Areas has been subject to an appraisal, identifying the special character of the area. Management Plans have been put in place in order to recommend the improvements and changes needed to preserve and enhance the character of each Conservation Area. Further information on the Conservation Area Appraisals and Management Plans can be found here. A brief description and map of each conservation area can be found below.

Adelphi Road

Incorporating the cul-de-sac residential street of Adelphi Road and the historic development surrounding the junction of Hook Road and East Street. The conservation area contains a group of 19th century artisan houses and three pairs of Grade II listed Surrey vernacular weatherboard cottages. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Adelphi Road Conservation Area Map (pdf - 353kb)

Burgh Heath Road


An attractive residential area of mainly late 19th or early 20th century buildings, this area is characterised by large houses set in spacious plots with mature trees. Many of these houses provide interesting examples of Surrey Vernacular Revival or Arts and Crafts styles and details. This conservation area is covered by an Article 4 Direction. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Burgh Heath Road Conservation Area Map (pdf - 2.99mb)

Chalk Lane

Notable for its prestigious houses, some of which are listed Grade II*, the area is also comprised of narrow country lanes, often enclosed by high brick boundary walls. There are three Georgian houses listed Grade II* and a variety of more modest houses and cottages, some of them providing examples of Surrey vernacular details such as white-painted timber weatherboarding and steeply pitched roofs covered in handmade peg tiles. The area is also notable for its historic links to the racehorse industry. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Chalk Lane Conservation Area Map (pdf - 3.11mb)

Church Street

This area is notable for its large historic buildings as well as more modestly sized 19th century houses. Narrow alleyways, typical of Epsom, cross diagonally through parts of the conservation area. This area also contains Epsom’s oldest building, the parish church of St Martin of Tours, which retains a remodelled mid-15th century tower. This conservation area is covered by an Article 4 Direction. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Church Street Conservation Area Map (pdf - 1.89mb)

College Road

A modestly sized residential area to the south east of Epsom town centre with a mixture of mainly 19th century buildings, including paired weather-boarded cottages which are listed Grade II. This conservation area is covered by an Article 4 Direction. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

College Road Conservation Area Map (pdf - 1.19mb)

Downs Road Estate

The Downs Road Estate Conservation Area is a cohesive residential development of early 1960s houses designed by the architect Kenneth Bland. Bland provided designs for a number of building types which, despite their contemporary appearance, used traditional materials and details such as the clay pantiles for the roofs and timber casement windows. The area is characterised by an attractive environment with the houses set back from the road behind open front gardens.This conservation area is covered by an Article 4 Direction. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Downs Road Estate Conservation Area Map (pdf - 1.46mb)

Epsom Town Centre

Epsom Town Centre Conservation Area is a compact area taking in the historic core of Epsom and most of its oldest buildings. It consists essentially of the High Street, but with short extensions westwards into West Street and South Street and eastwards into Waterloo Road, Ashley Avenue and the Upper High Street. A high proportion of the buildings are listed and the historic character of the conservation area has been maintained despite the construction of larger late 20th century buildings behind these high street frontages. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Epsom Town Centre Conservation Area Map (pdf - 2.17mb)

Ewell Downs Road / The Green

This conservation area comprises a quiet residential suburb, almost exclusively developed from the late 1920s onwards by a local builder, Ernest Harwood. Designed by Epsom architects Pettett and Gardner, the vernacular style houses retain elements taken from the historic buildings of Surrey with steeply pitched tiled roofs, tiled and timber-framed decoration, leaded light windows, and a variety of front doors and porches. This conservation area is covered by an Article 4 Direction. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Ewell Downs Road/The Green Conservation Area Map (pdf - 1.07mb)

Ewell Village

Ewell Village Conservation Area is one of the largest in the Borough, and encompasses the commercial village centre as well as outlying residential areas. The village centre is characterised by groups of mainly modestly sized, vernacular buildings, which give Ewell the character of an old Surrey village. The informal road pattern, with a crossroads at the village centre, provides an attractive setting to the many listed buildings, the highest concentration of which can be found in Church Street. Of note are the springs, watercourses and ponds, areas of dense woodland, and more open green spaces, some of them associated with the schools which are located close by. Bourne Hall, a 1960s building of some merit, is an important local amenity and is owned and managed by the Council as a public library, café and local history museum. This conservation area is covered by an Article 4 Direction. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Ewell Village Conservation Area Map (pdf - 4.22mb)

Higher Green / Longdown Lane

This conservation area comprises a quiet residential suburb, almost exclusively developed from the late 1920s onwards by a local builder, Ernest Harwood. The vernacular style houses retain elements taken from the historic buildings of Surrey with steeply pitched tiled roofs, tiled and timber-framed decoration, leaded light windows, and a variety of front doors and porches. This conservation area is covered by an Article 4 Direction. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Higher Green/Longdown Lane Conservation Area Map (pdf - 725kb)

The Hospital Cluster - Horton, Long Grove, The Manor, St. Ebba's, West Park

The five conservation areas making up the Epsom Hospitals Cluster have a short but significant social and architectural history. This started in the late 19th century when the former London County Council (LCC) purchased the land and buildings which once made up the Horton Manor Estate to provide a site for new hospitals for the mentally infirm of London. Although the conservation areas are now almost all in purely residential uses, and much demolition and rebuilding has taken place, the survival of many of the original buildings, and the important landscape setting and trees, means that the designation of the five sites as conservation areas is both worthwhile and justifiable. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Hospital Cluster Conservation Area Map (pdf - 2.98mb)

Lintons Lane

A suburban conservation area, close to Epsom town centre, it is characterised by two streets of late 19th century post-railway residential development (Victoria Place, Leith Road) and one street of early 20th century residential development (Middle Lane). Lintons Lane, which lies between these two architecturally contrasting sub-areas, is an older road dating from the late 18th century which contains Grade II listed cottages. This conservation area is partially covered by an Article 4 Direction. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Lintons Lane Conservation Area Map (pdf - 806kb)

Pikes Hill

A compact area of well detailed residential property which developed initially in the early 19th century and then expanded after the railway arrived in c.1850. The street pattern reflects the earlier bridleways and footpaths but the varied houses and cottages are typical of the 19th century with brick elevations, often enlivened by the use of terracotta, and mainly slate roofs. This conservation area is covered by an Article 4 Direction. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Pikes Hill Conservation Area Map (pdf - 677kb)

Providence Place

The conservation area comprises two small 19th century low-status residential developments, Providence Place (c. 1865) and Beaconsfield Place (c. 1880) plus a short length of Church Road that contains a typical late 19th century former church and further examples of late 19th century brick-built houses. The short streets are laid out in a rectilinear grid pattern between a railway line and a main road. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Providence Place Conservation Area Map (pdf - 514kb)

Stamford Green

The Stamford Green Conservation Area lies to the west of Epsom town centre, abutting the edge of Epsom Common. The picturesque green, with its pond and listed historic inn, forms the centrepiece of the area, which is also notable for its collection of late 19th century cottages. Many of these were built to house the workers in the hospitals, which were built in the locality at this time, and they form small groups, along with more modern buildings, which infiltrate the wooded landscape of the Common. The rolling topography and the survival of other green open spaces gives the conservation area a pleasantly sylvan character. This conservation area is covered by an Article 4 Direction. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Stamford Green Conservation Area Map (1.89mb)

Woodcote

The Woodcote Conservation Area is relatively small and is centred on the junction of South Street, Woodcote Road and Dorking Road. It includes four listed buildings (or groups of buildings) the most important of which is Woodcote Hall, a large mid 18th century stuccoed house. The other buildings are mainly 19th century or later in date, with two short rows of 17th or early 18th century cottages. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Woodcote Conservation Area Map (pdf - 887kb)

Worple Road

The Worple Road Conservation Area is a mainly residential area to the south east of Epsom Town Centre which was developed from the 1860s onwards with a variety of terraced, semi-detached and detached houses. The key streets in the conservation area are Worple Road and Ashley Road, both historic routes which connected the old village of Epsom around St Martin’s Church and the later town centre with the downland to the south. Narrow alleys, typical of the Epsom area and pre-dating the 19th century changes to the street layout, cross diagonally through the conservation area. This conservation area is covered by an Article 4 Direction. The full conservation area appraisal and management plan can be found here.

Worple Road Conservation Area Map (pdf - 1.49mb)

page updated: Friday, 07 November 2014 © Epsom & Ewell Borough Council 2014